Photo credit: International Fencing Federation, Junior and Cadet World Championships, Plovdiv, Bulgaria, April 2014.

Surfing the Internet isn’t always the most productive pastime, but once in a while it does pay off. I ran across another blog of a fencer, Jacqueline Kory, who is a graduate student at the MIT Media Lab in the Personal Robots Group. Her research focuses on educational technologies. MIT has a varsity fencing team for both men and women and competes in the intercollegiate Northeast Fencing Conference.

One of Kory’s posts, “How learning to fence also taught me about life, the universe, and everything” sums up nicely what she gained personally by learning how to fence. If you are a parent curious about your child’s interest in fencing, I hope that you read her post closely. The “soft” skills that she gained are valuable not only on the strip, but also in all ventures in every day life. Coaches can teach fencing techniques and train fencers for endurance and agility in order to make better athletes. However, there are some intangible gains that every coach hopes their fencers will achieve.

Read Jacqueline Kory’s post: How learning to fence also taught me about life, the universe, and everything.

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